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Tips for Boiling A Perfect Egg

Boiling eggs can be a pain. I’ve stabbed myself many times trying to peel shells that refuse to come off cleanly.

Over time I’ve collected several tips that have helped make the cooking and peeling processes easier.

To start with, finding a “perfect” way to boil eggs is difficult because there are so many factors to consider. Sometimes experimentation is necessary to determine how long to boil your eggs and which method works best for you.

First, depending on how runny or firm you like your eggs, the cooking time will vary.

  • Soft-Boiled: 4-6 minutes
  • Hard-Boiled: 8-12 minutes

Second, if you live at a higher elevation you may need to add a few minutes to the suggested cooking time. Mountain Mama Cooks suggests cooking the eggs uncovered and at a roaring boil.

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Third, the size of your eggs matter. A larger egg will need a slightly longer cooking time than a smaller one. Take this into consideration when looking at recipes. Is the recipe for an extra-large egg or a medium egg?

Methods

Most recipes for boiling eggs on the stove say to put the eggs in a pan first and pour cool water over them, bringing them to a boil after. However, some suggest letting the eggs sit out until they reach room temperature. Then, after bringing water to a boil, lower the eggs down into the water using a mesh strainer.

Another difference between methods is the cooking process itself. Some methods say to simmer the eggs after reaching a boil, while others say to remove the eggs from heat and sit covered for the cooking duration.

Tips for Boiling A Perfect Egg

Boiling eggs can be a pain. I’ve stabbed myself many times trying to peel shells that refuse to come off cleanly.

Over time I’ve collected several tips that have helped make the cooking and peeling processes easier.

To start with, finding a “perfect” way to boil eggs is difficult because there are so many factors to consider. Sometimes experimentation is necessary to determine how long to boil your eggs and which method works best for you.

First, depending on how runny or firm you like your eggs, the cooking time will vary.

  • Soft-Boiled: 4-6 minutes
  • Hard-Boiled: 8-12 minutes

Second, if you live at a higher elevation you may need to add a few minutes to the suggested cooking time. Mountain Mama Cooks suggests cooking the eggs uncovered and at a roaring boil.

Third, the size of your eggs matter. A larger egg will need a slightly longer cooking time than a smaller one. Take this into consideration when looking at recipes. Is the recipe for an extra-large egg or a medium egg?

Methods

Most recipes for boiling eggs on the stove say to put the eggs in a pan first and pour cool water over them, bringing them to a boil after. However, some suggest letting the eggs sit out until they reach room temperature. Then, after bringing water to a boil, lower the eggs down into the water using a mesh strainer.

Another difference between methods is the cooking process itself. Some methods say to simmer the eggs after reaching a boil, while others say to remove the eggs from heat and sit covered for the cooking duration.

Cooking Tips

Whichever method you use, these following tips will be useful to you:

  • Cover the eggs with at least 1 inch of water.
  • Set a timer. Timing is very important. You’ll know the eggs are overcooked if you see a green or grayish ring around the yolk.
  • Ice Bath. After the desired cook time, transfer your eggs immediately into a bowl filled with water and ice. (Use tongs to gently move the eggs into the icy water.)
  • Let them sit. After 5 to 10 minutes they should be ready to peel!

Tips to Prevent Cracking

●        Do not crowd the pan. Cook only a single layer of eggs at a time.

  • Use older eggs. Fresh eggs are harder to peel. If you buy your eggs directly from a farmer, you will want to wait a week or two before boiling them. If you buy from a grocery store, they are already a few weeks old. So no need to wait!
  • Do not put eggs from the fridge directly into hot or boiling water on the stove.
  • Adding vinegar and/or salt to the water may help prevent cracking and soften the shells for peeling.

Tips for Peeling

  • Peel your eggs at room temperature (not chilled).
  • Roll the egg across a hard surface with the palm of your hand, creating a series of cracks in the shell. The membrane should detach and peel easily.
  • Peel under cool, slow-running water.

Storing Boiled Eggs

You can store soft-boiled eggs (still in the shell) for up to two days. Do not freeze them.

Unpeeled hard-boiled eggs can stay in the fridge for up to a week.

Cooking Tips

Whichever method you use, these following tips will be useful to you:

  • Cover the eggs with at least 1 inch of water.
  • Set a timer. Timing is very important. You’ll know the eggs are overcooked if you see a green or grayish ring around the yolk.
  • Ice Bath. After the desired cook time, transfer your eggs immediately into a bowl filled with water and ice. (Use tongs to gently move the eggs into the icy water.)
  • Let them sit. After 5 to 10 minutes they should be ready to peel!

Tips to Prevent Cracking

●        Do not crowd the pan. Cook only a single layer of eggs at a time.

  • Use older eggs. Fresh eggs are harder to peel. If you buy your eggs directly from a farmer, you will want to wait a week or two before boiling them. If you buy from a grocery store, they are already a few weeks old. So no need to wait!
  • Do not put eggs from the fridge directly into hot or boiling water on the stove.
  • Adding vinegar and/or salt to the water may help prevent cracking and soften the shells for peeling.

Tips for Peeling

  • Peel your eggs at room temperature (not chilled).
  • Roll the egg across a hard surface with the palm of your hand, creating a series of cracks in the shell. The membrane should detach and peel easily.
  • Peel under cool, slow-running water.

Storing Boiled Eggs

You can store soft-boiled eggs (still in the shell) for up to two days. Do not freeze them.

Unpeeled hard-boiled eggs can stay in the fridge for up to a week.