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Why pay a premium for non-slip hangers when you can make them at home for free??

I have a love-hate relationship with non-slip hangers. They’re really nice for hanging up specific shirts and sweaters that tend to slip off of normal plastic hangers. But I hate using non-slip hangers for my normal shirts, because it makes it much harder to get my shirts on and off of them!

The problem is that non-slip hangers usually come in packs. So then I feel obligated to use all of them, even though I really only needed two or three of them for specific shirts. But I recently decided that those multi-packs of non-slip hangers are more trouble than they are worth (not to mention more expensive than they’re worth as well!)

Related: 11 Clever Uses For Hot Glue That Will Make Your Life Easier

Instead, I’ve figured out some quick and easy ways to turn my normal plastic hangers into non-slip hangers! That way, I can make only as many non-slip hangers as I need, and save myself some money while I’m at it! These methods couldn’t be any easier, and use inexpensive materials that you probably already have at home!

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How To Turn A Regular Hanger Into A Non-Slip Hanger

Method #1 – Pipe Cleaners

Take a couple of good old fashioned pipe cleaners, and wrap them around the top part of the hanger on each end (where the shoulders of your shirts and blouses rest.) You wrap just one pipe cleaner on each end, or you add more if you want to increase the non-slip surface.

Method #2 – Hot Glue

Warm up your hot glue gun, then pipe a zig-zag line of hot glue onto each end of a hanger. Allow the glue to dry completely before hanging anything on it. Once the glue dries, it will remain slightly tacky and keep your shirts in place!

Method #3 – Rubber Bands

Take two large rubber bands and wrap one around each end of a hanger. Wrap it around as many times as you can to keep it in place, covering as much area as possible. The friction from the rubber band will keep your shirts from slipping off!

After having tried and used all three versions, I can honestly say that I don’t really have a strong preference of one over the others. But if you’re concerned about the aesthetic appeal of these hangers will look in your closet, stick with Method #2. (The hot glue hangers are probably the least noticeable among regular hangers.)

Which non-slip method would you be most likely to try?



This article originally appeared on Source and was reproduced with permission